Follow by Email

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Giardia, The Most Common Pool Parasite is Not Your Neighbor

Giardia is a recreational water illness and is the most commonly found parasite in swimming pool water. This parasite can cause an intestinal illness in humans. It is possible to be infected even in a properly treated pool if the parasite is ingested before it has had adequate time to be killed. Casual contact of pool water into the mouth can ingest Giardia.

Although most bacteria are treated with recommended chlorine levels parasites like giardia are 15,000 times more resistant.

Giardia can be introduced into the pool water by fecal matter from infected animals or humans. It can take up to ten days for symptoms to occur after ingestion. Symptoms can be diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue, gas and bloating. It is highly recommended that people that have had diarrhea recently not use a swimming pool so that contamination cannot occur. However this advice of unhealthy pool behavior is not always followed placing other swimmers at risk. Persons with weakened immune systems and young children are at a greater risk of serious illness if infected with Giardia.


To determine if a swimming pool has Giardia you must take a water sample to a state or private testing lab. Testing for the presence of particular bacteria is not easily done by the pool operator so there are guidelines to be followed if a fecal accident occurs. If there has been a fecal accident in the swimming pool it should be treated properly according to guidelines set by the local bather code or the CDC. You must first determine if the fecal incident is a hard stool or loose stool as with diarrhea. Diarrhea usually occurs with a more virulent strain of bacteria so treatment for loose stools is much more stringent for chlorine level and concentration time of the chlorine to kill the possible bacteria.

Many of the pathogenic microbes are removed by swimming pool and spa filters but sand filters do not filter to a low enough micron to remove any of them.  DE filters and cartridge filters do the best job of removing microbes from the water.

Formed stools can act as a container for germs and removing them from the pool without breaking the stool apart can decrease the amount of bacteria released into the pool. In contrast a loose stool is more likely to contain bacteria and release them into the pool. Be sure to treat the stool removal tools so re-infection does not occur. It is not recommended to vacuum the stool from the pool.

If any type of fecal accident does occur you must first have all the swimmers leave the pool. This includes any pool that is on the same filtration system. If they are separate bodies of water but share the filtration system all bodies of water must be cleared.

For both formed stools and diarrhea, remove as much of the fecal matter as possible using a net or scoop device. Dispose of this matter into a plastic bag and use a trash container outside of pool facility to dispose in. Sanitize the net or scoop. You can place the net or scoop into the pool water while it is being treated.

We use a CT value which is the concentration time of free available chlorine in part per million (ppm) multiplied by the time in minutes. The CT value for Giardia is 45. Therefore if we take 45 and divide by 4ppm it would take 12 minutes to treat the pool with 4ppm of free chlorine.

For formed stools, raise the free chlorine level to 2ppm and adjust the pH between 7.2 – 7.5. The pH level is very important as it determines how active the chlorine will be. Maintain a free chlorine level of 2ppm for 30 minutes with the pool closed. 2ppm must be maintained until the end of the 30 minutes. Check with your local codes to see if they require any other times or chlorine levels. If there is a presence of chlorine stabilizers, a higher chlorine concentration may be required. Also increasing the chlorine level can decrease the amount of time for the pool closure or concentration time of the chlorine by using the before mentioned formula for CT value.

For diarrhea or loose stools we want to raise the free chlorine level to 20ppm and maintain the pH between 7.2 – 7.5. This will ensure treatment for more chlorine resistant bacteria if present. One of the most chlorine resistant bacteria is Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidium has a CT value of 9600 and a free chlorine residual of 20ppm must be maintained for 8 hours to treat the pool.

The pool filtration system needs to be running during the treatment time. With diarrhea treatment the filter system needs to be backwashed or have the media changed if filter type requires such operation after treatment. Do not return the backwash water into the pool.

Swimmers can be allowed back into the pool once the CT value has been met and the chlorine level has been returned to normal operating range as allowed by state code.

If this is a public pool then a fecal accident documentation form should be recorded. This record should provide what type of stool it was and what treatment was taken as well as any other actions including disinfecting of equipment and filter cleaning. A log of the pool chemical parameters upon re-opening of the pool should also be noted.

Giardia and other harmful bacteria can be introduced to the pool at any time and the pool operator should always be knowledgeable and have the equipment to react quickly.
For more information:  CDC Giardia Prevention

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Can Pool Chemicals be Added Through Skimmer or how to screw up a perfectly good pool.

Can Chemicals be added Through the Pool Skimmer?
To keep an inviting pool it is a necessity to add chemicals on a routine basis. These may be your sanitizer or balancing chemicals. Chemicals come in many forms and can be quick dissolving or slow dissolving. But many chemical solutions do not mix and can cause serious complications including equipment and pool damage as well as physical injury from combustion.
The most commonly used product that is put into a pool skimmer is chlorine tablets. This is done when there is no other chemical feeder installed in the pool system. Calcium hypochlorite tablets are quick dissolving and have a high pH so it is readily dissolved and only in the system a matter of minutes. However stabilized chlorine tablets commonly called Trichloro may remain in the skimmer for days or weeks. These tablets have a very low pH of 2.8 and can damage equipment making it brittle or erode even if the pump is running constantly. This is often why many pool heaters corrode and then the copper from the heater enters the pool and causes staining. If the pool is on a timer these tablets should never be used in the skimmer as a strong concentration of chlorine and low pH develops in a small area and can leach out onto the pool wall and into the equipment and valves of the system. Cartridge filters with a stainless steel rod in them corrode rapidly as well.
If cal hypo tablets and trichloro tablets are put into the skimmer together either on purpose or by mistake a chemical explosion could occur. It is always recommended to use a chemical erosion type feeder for trichloro tablets. A floater can be also used but they tend to float to one area and the same problem of concentration can occur. Also floaters are not recommended in vinyl pools or any color surface pools. If the floater breaks or fails the tablets can drop and bleach the area of the pool.
There is a trichloro product on the market in stick form that has a built in protector for when the flow of water is stopped in the skimmer to prevent the tablet from further dissolving. They are more in cost and are marketed more towards residential pools.
It is not recommended to use the skimmer to administer any chemical as the chemicals could be reached by bathers in the pool. This would not be safe and could cause injury.
Do not add “shock” products or granular /powder forms of chlorine to the skimmer either. These should be added to a bucket with water already in it and diluted before pouring around the edges of the pool. It is of the highest importance that these products be added TO water and never add water to the chemical as explosion will occur. Even a bead of sweat dropped onto a couple of ounces of calcium hypochlorite can cause an explosion. Always wear safety goggles as chlorine can do irreparable damage to the eye.
Dichloro, Lithium and Sodium Hypochlorite (liquid bleach) can be added directly to pool with caution. If any product falls to the floor of pool it should be brushed immediately. Liquid chlorine should be added from a close distance to pool water and around the pool perimeter. Also, take note of wind so that product does not blow out of pool or back onto you.
Most balancing chemicals for pH adjustment, total alkalinity, cyanuric acid and calcium hardness are added directly to the pool and brushed. Do not add in one area. Never add these products to the skimmer as they can clog the lines and also would react adversely to chlorine solutions. If calcium increaser is added in one area and not brushed it can form a hard mass that is next to impossible to remove. This can happen in the pool lines as well.
The pool skimmer is there to skim the top of the water removing debris and return water to the pump. Although it is inviting to use otherwise it is not wise and can be dangerous.

The picture above is of a 4 year old originally blue vinyl liner 25 mil. It was bleached, brittle and wrinkled under the skimmer area. Because his main drain line was connected to the skimmer it was the same around his bottom drain. This homeowner used chlorine Trichloro tablets in his skimmer and used a timer to turn his pump off for a period of time each day. This was a $3,000 replacement cost.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Keep Your pH in the Safe Zone!


 

Friday, December 2, 2011

Chloramines

How Chloramines Are Formed and the Best Way to Eliminate Them



Chloramines are a nuisance to swimming pool operators and users which need to be eliminated to assure a safe and inviting swimming experience. Preventative measures to keep chloramines at a minimum combined with adequate testing and corrective chemical action by the pool operator can avoid many pool problems resulting from their presence. New technology now enables the pool operator to control chloramines easier and more effectively.

Chloramines are formed when a halogen or chlorine based sanitizer is introduced into the water and reacts or combines with waste such as sweat, urine and ammonia to name a few. The chloramines compounds do not have an effective disinfecting ability and require one hundred more times the contact time to be as effective as free chlorine. These build a chlorine demand which must be met before a residual amount of chlorine or free chlorine can become present for disinfection. If the demand is not met with the amount of chlorine added then more chloramines can be formed.

Foul smelling odor, cloudy water, eye irritation, and skin irritation are a few of the problems that chloramines can cause. These are not desirable in any swimming pool environment and therefore must be controlled or eliminated.

Regular testing for combined chlorine indicates the presence of chloramines. Many quality test kits allow you to test for Free Chlorine then an additional Total Chlorine reading. Free Chlorine is the available chlorine to disinfect the water. Total Chlorine is all chlorine present in the water. To find the combined chlorine reading or chloramines in the water you need to subtract the Free Chlorine from the Total Chlorine reading with the result being the amount of chloramines or combined chlorine in the water. A reading above .2 of combined chlorine lets you know that treatment is needed. If you find that the level of combined chlorine continually is high in your pool then a change in the chemical maintenance may be necessary. This may change with temperature, bather load and other environmental factors.

To decrease the wastes entering the pool it is recommended for bathers to shower before entering the pool water. Although the wastes washed off of one person entering the pool may not seem like much when multiplied by many swimmers it can be a significant amount. Keeping pool decks clean and disinfected can also decrease the amount of wastes entering the pool. Having people that have recently had diarrhea not enter the pool for a period of time and having babies with diapers use swim pants also helps in preventative measures.

If chloramines are detected regularly it may be necessary to increase the amount of chlorine being generated into the pool to help meet the initial demand of wastes and decrease the frequency in which the pool must be treated to remove the chloramines.

To eliminate chloramines the pool water must be treated by raising the pool chlorine level or oxidizing the pool water to chemically break up the chloramines compounds. This is generally referred to as a “shock” treatment or super chlorination, when the free chlorine level is raised to ten times the amount of chloramines present. This has been the standard procedure for many years. This will eliminate the chloramines bond but also can leave high chlorine residual which must come back to normal levels before swimming is resumed. Recently the calculation for this has changed to account for the high chlorine level. Now we multiply the combined chlorine times 10 and then subtract the existing free chlorine reading. This end result is the amount of chlorine to be raised.

Recently there have been other options offered for chloramines removal. The use of a monopersulfate chemical which oxidizes the pool but does not leave a high residual of free chlorine is an accepted alternative. This is used on many “salt” or chlorine generation systems that do not have the ability of a boost cycle.

The use of ozone as a supplemental sanitizer has been shown to greatly reduce the amount of chloramines present in the water. Ozone does not leave a residual in the water but instead combines with the molecules to destroy or change them at point of contact. This contact point is before the sanitizer is added into the system. Therefore there is less waste to combine with the chlorine being addedafter oxidation. This in turn will create a lower chlorine demand for wastes before disinfecting the water. This is recommended also with chlorine generators to prolong the life of the cell.

UV light is effective in eliminating chloramines as it changes the molecules where they cannot reproduce and are then harmless. This method also does not leave a residual and is introduced to the pool water before the sanitizer is administered as in ozone.

Chloramines are the most important factor in pool water chemistry for the pool operator to be aware of and act upon. Eliminating wastes before entering the pool and regular testing of the water to determine chloramines levels are important to controlling the combined chlorine levels. Using a supplemental sanitizer to the system without raising the residual free chlorine would be preferable as many of these systems are more effective in treating chloramines and do not require a time of non swimming to let chlorine levels drop to an acceptable level. To be able to destroy chloramines on a continual basis with ozone or UV would allow for less sanitizer use and leave a safe friendly pool environment.

Friday, December 2, 2011

Chloramines

How Chloramines Are Formed and the Best Way to Eliminate Them



     Chloramines are a nuisance to swimming pool operators and users which need to be eliminated to assure a safe and inviting swimming experience.  Preventative measures to keep chloramines at a minimum combined with adequate testing and corrective chemical action by the pool operator can avoid many pool problems resulting from their presence.  New technology now enables the pool operator to control chloramines easier and more effectively.

     Chloramines are formed when a halogen or chlorine based sanitizer is introduced into the water and reacts or combines with waste such as sweat, urine and ammonia to name a few.  The chloramines compounds do not have an effective disinfecting ability and require one hundred more times the contact time to be as effective as free chlorine. These build a chlorine demand which must be met before a residual amount of chlorine or free chlorine can become present for disinfection.  If the demand is not met with the amount of chlorine added then more chloramines can be formed.

     Foul smelling odor, cloudy water, eye irritation, and skin irritation are a few of the problems that chloramines can cause.  These are not desirable in any swimming pool environment and therefore must be controlled or eliminated.

     Regular testing for combined chlorine indicates the presence of chloramines.  Many quality test kits allow you to test for Free Chlorine then an additional Total Chlorine reading.  Free Chlorine is the available chlorine to disinfect the water.  Total Chlorine is all chlorine present in the water.  To find the combined chlorine reading or chloramines in the water you need to subtract the Free Chlorine from the Total Chlorine reading with the result being the amount of chloramines or combined chlorine in the water.  A reading above .2 of combined chlorine lets you know that treatment is needed.  If you find that the level of combined chlorine continually is high in your pool then a change in the chemical maintenance may be necessary.  This may change with temperature, bather load and other environmental factors.

     To decrease the wastes entering the pool it is recommended for bathers to shower before entering the pool water.  Although the wastes washed off of one person entering the pool may not seem like much when multiplied by many swimmers it can be a significant amount.  Keeping pool decks clean and disinfected can also decrease the amount of wastes entering the pool.  Having people that have recently had diarrhea not enter the pool for a period of time and having babies with diapers use swim pants also helps in preventative measures.

     If chloramines are detected regularly it may be necessary to increase the amount of chlorine being generated into the pool to help meet the initial demand of wastes and decrease the frequency in which the pool must be treated to remove the chloramines.

     To eliminate chloramines the pool water must be treated by raising the pool chlorine level or oxidizing the pool water to chemically break up the chloramines compounds.  This is generally referred to as a “shock” treatment or super chlorination, when the free chlorine level is raised to ten times the amount of chloramines present.  This has been the standard procedure for many years.  This will eliminate the chloramines bond but also can leave high chlorine residual which must come back to normal levels before swimming is resumed.  Recently the calculation for this has changed to account for the high chlorine level.  Now we multiply the combined chlorine times 10 and then subtract the existing free chlorine reading.  This end result is the amount of chlorine to be raised.  

      Recently there have been other options offered for chloramines removal.  The use of a monopersulfate chemical which oxidizes the pool but does not leave a high residual of free chlorine is an accepted alternative.  This is used on many “salt” or chlorine generation systems that do not have the ability of a boost cycle.

     The use of ozone as a supplemental sanitizer has been shown to greatly reduce the amount of chloramines present in the water.  Ozone does not leave a residual in the water but instead combines with the molecules to destroy or change them at point of contact.  This contact point is before the sanitizer is added into the system.  Therefore there is less waste to combine with the chlorine being addedafter oxidation.  This in turn will create a lower chlorine demand for wastes before disinfecting the water.  This is recommended also with chlorine generators to prolong the life of the cell.

     UV light is effective in eliminating chloramines as it changes the molecules where they cannot reproduce and are then harmless.  This method also does not leave a residual and is introduced to the pool water before the sanitizer is administered as in ozone.

     Chloramines are the most important factor in pool water chemistry for the pool operator to be aware of and act upon.  Eliminating wastes before entering the pool and regular testing of the water to determine chloramines levels are important to controlling the combined chlorine levels.  Using a supplemental sanitizer to the system without raising the residual free chlorine would be preferable as many of these systems are more effective in treating chloramines and do not require a time of non swimming to let chlorine levels drop to an acceptable level.  To be able to destroy chloramines on a continual basis with ozone or UV would allow for less sanitizer use and leave a safe friendly pool environment.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Hot Tubs Demand More Than Swimming Pool

 
Hot Tub Demands More Than Pool

     Imagine a sixteen by thirty two foot, home residential swimming pool with a family of four and their five friends in the pool of approximately twenty thousand gallons.  Then imagine them all getting out and entering a five hundred gallon hot tub with heated water.  You have the same amount of people and wastes in forty times less the amount of water. 

      When using a hot tub there are guidelines that should be observed to protect your health and safety.  Due to the nature of the high temperature of the water, small area of vessel, lesser depth and the increased velocity of water and air the spa is much more demanding.

     Water chemistry and sanitizer levels are more easily changed with the smaller volume of water in relation to the bodies entering the spa water.  Sanitizers not only dissipate quicker in the warmer water but also have a larger demand due to the sweat and urine introduced.  The pH can change with the introduction of air and bodies as well.   This pH change can also have an effect on the rate of sanitizing kill time.  A swimming pool generally requires lower sanitizer levels as sanitizer can be replaced in the normal turnover cycle.  Also, the dilution of wastes in the larger amount of water along with cooler temperatures does not allow bacteria growth as quickly as a heated spa.  However, if the pool is heated you will see an increase in the demand of sanitizer as well.

     Filtration is a crucial part in water clarity and removal of wastes in both the spa and pool.  Spas require a turnover of approximately once every thirty minutes as opposed to a commercial pool of one turnover every four hours.  To accomplish the need for better filtration it is recommended to use a cartridge filter on a spa.  Many commercial swimming pools use sand filters although depending on the facility this is becoming a thing of the past due to energy concerns and the quest for better water clarity.  The cartridge filter allows a finer micron to be filtered out with one turnover.  Also the square footage on a cartridge filter is much greater than a sand filter can offer to accommodate the increase in dirt removal.  Even with the offering of glass media which would prevent the clay formation of sand in hot water, the square footage and large micron removal makes a sand filter unsuitable for spas.  

     Spas can build total dissolved solids quicker than a swimming pool.  A spa should be drained and thoroughly cleaned often.  This includes the filter to be chemically cleaned.  Total dissolved solids can inhibit the way sanitizers work in the spa and also cause cloudy water.  Swimming pools are rarely drained and can be diluted to help compensate for an increase of dissolved solids.  Also a swimming pool can change the type of sanitizer being used to slow down the increase of solids.

     Both swimming pools and hot tubs alike have the same need for submerged suction safety.  Neither should be allowed to operate with a drain cover missing or broken.  Inspection for entrapment is equally important.

     With the hot water of the spa it is also important that the user’s health be taken into account.  People with heart problem history, users of prescription drugs and people with high blood pressure need to consult with their doctor before using.  It is not recommended for pregnant women or children to use hot water spas. Spas can be highly therapeutic for others.  However, swimming is recommended for all people.  It is one of the best forms of exercise and enjoyment for a wide range of people.

Friday, November 11, 2011

Sometimes a Green Pool is Good

Green Pools

Do you want a green pool? Well that all depends on what kind of green. We can help you with all kinds of green in and for your pool.
Many people this time of year open with a green pool that is the yucky, uninviting type. Other people open their pool wondering how they can reduce energy costs without losing efficiency. With over forty years experience we have found products to achieve excellent results. None of this is new to us. We have been installing energy efficient systems since the mid eighties and helping pools get up and running since the late sixties.

This year we are thrilled to have a product that we have been testing for the past year, Pool Rescue. This product is a strong non chlorine oxidizer in powder form that will clear the most nasty pool. It also will float to the top of the pool for easy removal all the old leaves and algae clumps. When the pool clears we then perform a test to determine exactly how much chlorine is needed to get your pool to swimming condition. We like this because it is easy, there is no guess work, proven results and saves money. Also there is no bleaching to painted or vinyl surfaces.

Want to save 98% energy costs on your pool pump? We have a large selection of variable speed pumps that do just that. Although we have been using 2-speed pumps since 1985 and have reduced costs to as little as $25 a month to run a 1.5 hp pump 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; the new variable speed pumps save even more. We offer variable speed and variable flow. Using a filter that requires only .17 gallons flow to operate (yes there is a (.) decimal point there) instead of 20 gallons flow to operate such as sand filter you need less pump (less energy) to get greater filtration. The new filters also are more user friendly. If you have had or heard of a cartridge filter that gets clogged all the time and is a maintenance nightmare it usually is because the pump has been sized incorrectly.
Hampstead Pool also carries two complete lines of all natural products to treat your pool. Natural Chemistry has been the leader for many years in phosphate (algae food) removal with their unique enzyme products. They have expanded to products that are phosphate free as well and all natural. I've been told you could drink the product but I have rules against that and so does the EPA. We also carry Sea Klear products which have been using crab shell by products for decades to become the best clarifier without using polymers (polymers can cloud a pool if too much is used). Sea Klear has also expanded their line of products to phosphate removers, tile cleaners, metal removers and such.

Come see us or give us a call and let us help you become more or less green this year!

Keywords:hampstead pool swimming green fiberglass

Choose Your Pool Builder Wisely

Choose Wisely and Have No Regrets Later.

So many times I have customers come to our retail store and say, "I wish I knew about you before I bought." or "I have spent more money fixing my pool from the original installation." There are a few steps you can take to assure that your investment is a quality purchase.

First of all choose a contractor that holds a valid NC Contractors license. For swimming pools it may be a General contractors license with a swimming pool endorsement or a Swimming Pool Contractors license. You can go to http://www.nclbgc.net/lic_fr.html and search for the company (assets of company qualify for licensing) or the individual (personal assets used for qualification). Usually when a company name is the contractor is has a qualifier and is usually a larger company that has been in business for a longer period of time. In our fragile economy where there are business' going out everyday it is imperative to use a contractor regardless if the total of items purchased (pool, deck, etc. from one company totals) are $30,000 or above. The reason is that if the contractor goes out of business during your pool installation or runs into problems that are above his expertise such as ground water and leaves you with a large hole in your backyard you can turn to the NC Homeowners Recovery Fund if you have signed with a NC Licensed contractor. If you did not then it is up to you, your money and your lawyer if they have any assets to levy against.

Second of all check to see if they belong to their trade organization. Many times belonging to a trade organization will come with a set of ethics they must abide by. Reporting of problems to the trade organization will bring harsh actions against the company. A respectful company has a set of ethics regardless and does not transgress those. Also they are more likely to have up to date information regarding their trade. With all the new technology in pool treatment and energy efficiency your professional pool installer will know how to save you money and work. The old way may not be the best way anymore. Being a trade member they will also be updated on codes locally and nationally. This could save many headaches with approvals and building inspections.

Check the BBB (Better Business Bureau) listing. Be sure to look at the volume of business they do in relation to any complaints. Look to see if the complaints are of administrative nature (billing) or having to do with a repair or an actual installation. Large companies will more than likely have more administrative or scheduling conflicts. Did the company try to resolve the problem?

Visit their place of business. Is this a company that looks reputable and has a stable office location or do they work out of their home? Do they offer just installation or service what they sell? Can they test your water or do they refer you to someone else? Do they offer other pool services.


Ask how long their employees have been with them or do they use sub-contractors. BE SURE TO ASK IF THEY AND THEIR SUB-CONTRACTORS CARRY LIABILITY AND WORKMANS COMPENSATION. If someone gets hurt on your property and they do not carry insurance you could be liable. Ask for a certificate of verification. This is a normal business request.

Be sure to speak to references and go see some of their other work. Ask if the pictures on their website are theirs and can you see those pools or talk to those owners. Many times pirated pictures are used on websites. Ask if you can talk to a customer they had a problem with so you can see how they handled it. Remember that this is construction and if you hear of no problems then something is not true.

Just a few moments of your time can save you years of misery. Remember, "It is wise not to pay too much, but foolish to pay to little."

www.apsp.org www.hampsteadpoolspa.com www.trilogypools.com
Keywords:swimming pool contractors dealers designers

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

In Ground Swimming Pool Hurricane & Storm Preparedness

In Ground Swimming Pool Hurricane & Storm Preparedness
Before the Storm:
1.)   Secure the pool area.  Skimmer lids need to be removed and stored inside or screwed down so they do not become a projectile.  Patio furniture, grills etc. need to be properly stored.  DO NOT PUT FURNITURE  IN  VINYL SWIMMING POOL  OR GEL COATED FIBERGLASS POOLS.  You could puncture a vinyl pool or scrape a gel coated pool.  Glass table tops must be stored with care.  Broken glass cannot be easily (if at all) seen in pool water.
2.)    Chemically treat swimming pools.  Pool water can be used after a storm for flushing toilets and other non potable uses.
Double shock pool according to package directions.
Add an initial dose of Algaecide.
3.)   DO NOT DRAIN POOL WATER LEVEL DOWN.  Underground water will occur regardless of where the rain falls.  The pool water overflowing will not produce an effect different from rain falling.  A concrete deck will not discourage underground water.  Therefore it is imperative to keep as much water in the pool not only during storm but for a week or more after the rain event.  Ground water drains to pre storm levels slowly.  Vinyl liners may “float” during this time but water in the pool will help keep the surface under the liner in place.  Check with your pool professional before draining of a pool at any time as this may void your warranty and cause serious structural problems.
4.)  Prepare deck area.  Clean out deck drains by removing the top plate and flush the drainage pipes.  Rake back any mulch or grass that would inhibit water from running off of deck area.
5.)    Manually turn pool electrical breaker to the “off” position.  If you lose power during the storm you do not want this (or any electrical circuits) on when power is restored to cause a “surge”.
 KNOWING WHAT TO DO CAN BE THE DIFFERENCE
After Katrina

 Hampstead Pool, Spa & Patio Inc.
910-270-1199
wendy@hampsteadpool.com